Malva Mallow for Eczema, Burns and Skin Inflammation

Research is finding that Malva Mallow (Malva sylvestris) can significantly improve eczema and other skin inflammatory conditions. These include skin burns.

Common mallow and eczema
Common mallow improves inflammatory skin conditions.

Chronic eczema is considered medically as atopic dermatitis. This is symptomized by red and itchy skin which can flare up with little notice or seeming cause.

Children can often suffer from eczema at some point. Adults can also get it at some point. Plants such as poison oak and poison ivy also produce what is considered atopic dermatitis. But this form is an allergic form. (Only about 30 percent of adults are not allergic to poison oak/poison ivy.)

Mallow and eczema in children

Researchers from Iran’s Traditional and Complementary Medicine Research Center at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences tested a cream made from Malva sylvestris on 51 children with atopic dermatitis.

The children were divided into two groups. One group was treated topically with the Malva cream, applied twice daily for four weeks. The other group received a placebo cream. They were all tested before and after using the Scoring Atopic Dermatitis score (SCORAD) scoring system.

After the four weeks, the doctors found that the topical application of the herbal cream improved dermatitis scores and thickness scores compared to the placebo group.

The researchers concluded:

“According to the results of this clinical trial, it could be concluded that topical use of M. sylvestris extract cream was effective on the reduction of the AD symptoms in children.”

Mallow treats skin burns and inflammation

Other research has found that mallow cream can treat skin burns and other forms of skin inflammation.

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Researchers from Brazil’s Universidade Federal does Paraná tested an extract of Malva Mallow on skin inflammation on mouse ears. The researchers found the extract topically applied reduced the inflammation and reduced the damage to skin cells.

Doctors from the Tehran University of Medical Sciences conducted a series of laboratory studies using wound dressings with Malva sylvestris extract. These were used on skin damage caused by bacteria and from diabetes. The research found that the Common Mallow extract significantly improved wound healing rates.

Using Malva sylvestris

Malva Mallow is a creeping vine that grows in warmer climes around the world. Notably, it grows throughout North Africa and the Mediterranean. It also grows throughout Asia, Europe and other Western countries.

Common Mallow cream is not readily available. Most of the creams and extracts used in studies were produced by the researchers.

But we find readily available, Malva sylvestris teas and extracts. It should be noted that tea is a hot water extract. As such, a thick herbal tea can be or a few drops of extract can be blended with a healthy lotion or with some aloe vera to make a nice topical cream.

Any herbal extract should be should be applied carefully. Typically only a few drops would be mixed with six ounces of cream, and carefully tested on a small skin area before applying in a significant way.

Other herbs that improve eczema and other skin conditions include evening primrose oil and Aloe vera.

REFERENCES:

Meysami M, Hashempur MH, Kamalinejad M, Emtiazy M. Efficacy of Short Term Topical Malva Sylvestris L. Cream in Pediatric Patients with Atopic Dermatitis: A Randomized Double-Blind PlaceboControlled Clinical Trial. Endocr Metab Immune Disord Drug Targets. 2020 Oct 23. doi: 10.2174/1871530320666201023125411

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Prudente AS, Sponchiado G, Mendes DAGB, Soley BS, Cabrini DA, Otuki MF. Pre-clinical efficacy assessment of Malva sylvestris on chronic skin inflammation. Biomed Pharmacother. 2017 Sep;93:852-860. doi: 10.1016/j.biopha.2017.06.083.

Almasian A, Najafi F, Eftekhari M, Ardekani MRS, Sharifzadeh M, Khanavi M. Polyurethane/carboxymethylcellulose nanofibers containing Malva sylvestris extract for healing diabetic wounds: Preparation, characterization, in vitro and in vivo studies. Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl. 2020 Sep;114:111039. doi: 10.1016/j.msec.2020.111039.

Author

  • Ph.D. in Natural Health Sciences, Doctorate in Integrative Health Sciences, Board Certified Alternative Medicine Practitioner, California Naturopath. Diplomas in Blood Chemistry, Clinical Nutritional Counseling, Homeopathy, Aromatherapy, Colon Hydrotherapy, certificates in Pain Management and Case Management/Contact Tracing. Authored 28 books, numerous periodical articles on natural medicine. Contact: [email protected]

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